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Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Bulletin"

Bulletin of 

COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 

LEST THERE BE 



TOO LITTLE 








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MBER, 1950 



Vol. XLIII 



December, 



No. 3 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 

Entered as second-claBS matter at the post office at Decatur, Ga., under Act of August 24, 1912 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY AT DECATUR, GEORGIA 



GOD'S WORD MUST NOT BE BOUND 







It is not inappropriate that the Christian 
ministry should utilize the expression, "too little, too late". 

Rather, it is expedient at this time that Presbyterianism 
make to its members a prayerful plea that there be no 
rationing of God's Word in our time . . . that there may be 
no shortage of real hope in the desperate days which are 
ahead. 

The "Word" is the weapon of Christian ministers — 
through Christ. It is their only weapon, and the one instru- 
ment which can win any lasting victory. 

We believe you will agree that development of the 
intellectual powers of our Presbyterian ministerial students 
is necessary to effective interpretation of God's Word . . . 
surely, then, these men, the Church's counterparts of our 
nation's military and naval officers, should be granted every 
possible means for developing their use of the instrument 
of peace. 

Ministerial training must be unlimited . . . that there 
may not be too little spreading of Christ's message of love 
— too late. 



the word of God is not bound. 
2nd Timothy, 2:9 



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COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

^aw do mebe 

WITH ADDITIONAL LIBRARY SPACE 

In 1828 Columbia, with five ministerial students and one 
professor, began operations from a Presbyterian manse in 
Lexington, Ga. Its library consisted of 300 volumes. 

Two years later the seminary was moved to Columbia, S. C, 
and by 1850 boasted a 4,582 volume library. 

In 1927 the school was moved to Decatur, Ga. This location 
was deemed best suited as a means to serving an expanded 
territory — the synods of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, 
Florida and Mississippi. The area covers 247,785 square miles 
with a population today of well over 10,000,000 persons — 
less than one-half of whom are church members. 

The home challenge and the constant call from foreign 
fields have been accepted anew; and in 1950, with the largest 
student body in its history, Columbia is straining at its physical 
seams to provide sufficiently for intellectual and spiritual 
growth . . . 



36,000 VOLUMES CROWD SHELVES 

^^S4 wwbe Socdzb lo 6e tideled . . . 



Books are virtually stacked atop each other in a small 
area urgently needed for classrooms. For seminary students 
alone, the space is insufficient; but this treasury of research 
is also made available for use by students and faculty mem- 
bers of other colleges in this area as a part of Columbia's 
participation in the University Center of Georgia. There 
simply must be more space to make the library fully effective 
as a part of God's work. 

Study to shew thyself 
approved unto God . . . 

2nd Timothy, 2:15 




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YOU WILL HELP RAISE 



COLUMBIA WILL RECEIVE A FURTHER 



Enlarge the place of thy tent, and 
let them stretch forth the curtains of 
thy habitations; spare not, lengthen 
thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes. 

Isaiah 54:2 



PRESENT FACILITIES 

Compare the cramped space 
shown here for reading, re- 
search and stacking facilities 
with the modern library lay- 
outs shown on the following 
pages. 




ONLY 3,900 SQUARE FEET NOW AVAILABLE 



$250,000 BY OCTOBER 1, 1951 

Columbia can build a completely modern structure which 
will be ample to stack present and anticipated books con- 
veniently, and provide the necessary privacy for efficient re- 
search ... if this amount is secured by 1951 . . . 

SIFT OF $100,000 FOR THE LIBRARY 

This gift by an anonymous donor has been promised with 
the requirement that a minimum of $250,000 be raised for 
the erection of the building. The $100,000 lump sum will 
be used as added endowment for the library. 




he collection of books, historical documents and 
periodicals will inevitably increase. Approved plans 

call for a building of over 24,600 square feet to house nearly 100,000 

volumes. 

Modern in every feature the new library will have on its ground 
floor stacks, or rows of shelves, with convenient rooms for private 
research located nearby. On the first floor will be a large reading room, 
a work room, an office for the full-time librarian soon to be employed, 
and other necessary features. 

The Administration and Directors are agreed that a library of this 
size and over-all scope is absolutely essential for serving the churches 
and colleges in this area. It will require the $250,000 to erect the building 
and a minimum of $100,000 to provide for upkeep of the structure and 
maintenance of an adequate library staff. 











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NOTE THE SPACIOUSNESS AND CONVENIENCES 
OF THE NEW LIBRARY . . . 



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Note the private rooms (carrels) for research 
located at the end of the stacks. Stacks, or 
shelves, are about the height of an average 
man. This eliminates the old-fashioned lad- 
der climbing to obtain a top shelf book. 




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There will be adequate room for concen- 
trated reading and browsing for the many 
students and professors who will use this 
library. 




On partial second floor there will be sufficient space to stack additional volumes. 
Second floor will also have a class room equipped for projection of slides, movies 
and microfilm. 

fytill ' biacA; nea/Uu 400,000 wcJuww&J 

IN 24,600 SQUARE FEET 

(As against 36,000 volumes In only 3,900 square feet) 



TODAY... 








YESTERDAY 



Birthp/ace — 
Lexington, Ga. — 1828 

As "The Theological Seminary 
of the Synod of South Carolina 
and Georgia" the school began 
operations in this old manse. Dr. 
Thomas Goulding was the first 
professor. Columbia now serves 
five states. 



YOUR ACTION . . . NOW 
CAN PROVIDE FOR 
AN ENLARGED . . . 



TOMORROW... 




.-. 



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3¥ie /hsj/uj^y/ SBeSktztu 



WILL YOU HELP? 






Dear Friend: Colum bia Theological 

G0 d has been good ^J of service 

undertaking. 

Sincerely yours, 



Sincerely you**. 



president, 




Chairman 



BOARD 



for the 

OF D 



William A. L. Sibley, Esq. . South Carolina 
Rev. Sam Burney Hay .... Alabama 

Rev. U. S. Gordon Florida 

J. R. McCain, Esq Georgia 

Rev. Geo. M. Telford . South Carolina 
Rev. Dwyn M. Mounger . . Mississippi 

H. Lane Young, Esq Georgia 

Rev. R. E. Hough .... Mississippi 
Rev. Wm. V. Gardner .... Georgia 

N. P. Yowell, Esq Florida 

Rev. Stuart R. Oglesby 



RECTORS 

T. Guy Woolford, Esq. 
Rev. J. Herndon McCain 
Rev. James L. Doom 
J. W. Dickson, Esq. . 
Rev. W. H. Mcintosh . 
Rev. E. L. Hill . . . 
Ray Evers, Esq. . . . 
Rev. Edward G. Lilly . 
Rev. Jno. D. Thomas 
W. Herbert Smith, Esq. 
. . . Georgia 



. . Georgia 

Alabama 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

. Mississippi 

. . Georgia 

. . Alabama 

South Carolina 

. Florida 

South Carolina 



as 



. let everyone of you . . . 
God hath prospered . . . 

1st Corinthians, 16 ;2 



OF GOD'S WORD 



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COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Decatur, Georgia